Arbitration

Arbitration is a dispute resolution process conducted outside of court, in which the parties have decided to empower a third-party, who is neutral, to make a final decision in a matter in which the parties have a conflict.

How Arbitration Works

Choose a Third Party

Parties must mutually agree on an arbitrator and equally share the cost. They must agree that the arbitrator’s decision is final.

Arbitrator Manages Resolution Process

The process is designed and implemented by the parties, and the arbitrator manages the process, making fair decisions when the parties reach an impasse during the arbitration and a fair and final decision at the end of the hearing.

A Final Decision is Made

The arbitrator makes a final decision based on the facts presented, free of any bias, and always adhering to the highest standards of ethics and integrity.

Why La Rue

As an arbitrator, I follow two fundamental principles of the practice that, after years of successful dispute resolution, I have found produce the most successful results.

Principle I

One of the fundamental principles of arbitration is that the parties are seeking a fair and efficient resolution process. I firmly believe that an important part of the arbitrator’s role is to conduct a fair and efficient process from the filing for arbitration to the issuance of the award by the arbitrator.

Principle II

The arbitral process belongs to the parties to design and to implement. The role of the arbitrator is to manage the process, permitting the parties to agree where they can and being prepared to make a fair decision where the parties have reached an impasse. The management role of the arbitrator is crucial before the hearing and during the hearing if the first principle—fairness and efficiency—is to be achieved.

Conflict is inevitable in any relationship

—business or personal, but the outcome of a dispute is not foreordained.
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